Research – CAGE

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Research

Overall purpose and goal of CAGE 

In this project  we investigates how socio-economic and health inequities develop during the formative years in young refugees, and how they relate to each other and to key areas of welfare policy like health services, education, employment and housing. By cross-country comparisons identify welfare policies that may promote health and socio-economic equity in young refugees compared with the majority populations. 

Research questions
             
                 

1) To what extent does the educational achievement of young refugees with similar background characteristics vary by country and national policy? Does educational attainment “pay off” in employment in a similar manner in young refugees as in the majority population? In a similar manner for different groups of refugees, or are there indications of discrimination by skin color as a barrier for entry into the labor market? Does educational attainment predict the socio-economic and health situation in young adulthood in a similar manner in young refugees as in the majority population? Is “poor pay-off” in employment for educational achievement associated with trajectories leading to poor health outcomes?

2) Is youth unemployment associated with health and socio-economic trajectories in a similar manner in young refugees as in the majority population? To what extent do diverse youth unemployment rates in the Nordic countries lead to cross-country differences in health and socio-economic situation in youth in refugee families? Are their indications of a reversed causality where poor health prevents entry into the labor market? Do these trajectories vary by country, and if so can they be linked to national policies?

3) How is psychosocial wellbeing of refugee children and youth supported in schools and other settings? Do children and youth with a refugee background have access to somatic and mental health care in an equitable manner compared with the majority population?

4) Do unaccompanied minors have different outcomes in educational achievement, labor market participation, health and trajectories compared with refugee children who settled in the Nordic countries with their parents? To what extent does form of care (foster home, institution, relatives) and support involving child welfare, health or social services predict outcomes and trajectories in unaccompanied minors?

5) What is the effect of policies and practice of health reception on young refugees’ social and health related life-trajectories?

6) Does a national policy of dispersal of young refugees in small groups in many communities facilitate or impair educational achievement, employment and health?